Grants to Reduce

Violent Crimes Against

Women on Campus Program

 

 

Training and Technical Assistance Institute

 

October 27 – 28, 2004

 

Hosted by the

University of Illinois - Chicago

 

For recipients of FY 99, 00, 01, 02 & 03

Grants to Reduce Violent Crimes Against Women on Campus Program

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This project was supported by Grant No. 2004-WA-VX-K001 awarded by the Office on Violence Against Women, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice. Points of view in this document are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

 


 

California Coalition Against Sexual Assault

Campus Program Training & Technical Assistance Institute

Hosted by the University of Illinois at Chicago

 

Tuesday, October 26, 2004

8:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.

Judicial Affairs Registration ONLY

Salon 10 Foyer (3rd Floor)

9:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Judicial Affairs Training

Ed N. Stoner II, Attorney at Law, Reed Smith

Salon 10 (3rd Floor)

7:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.

General Institute Registration-

Red Laquer Room Foyer (4th Floor)

Wednesday, October 27, 2004

8:00 a.m. – 8:30 a.m.

Registration

Red Laquer Room Foyer (4th Floor)

8:00 a.m. – 8:30 a.m.

Continental Breakfast

Red Laquer Room Foyer (4th Floor)

8:30 a.m. – 8:45 a.m.

Welcome – Red Laquer Room (4th Floor)

Myrta Charles, Office on Violence Against Women, DOJ

Sandy Ortman, Director of Special Programs, CALCASA

8:45 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.

Keynote Address: Beth Richie, Ph.D

“Anti-Violence Work as Anti-Racist Work: Working for Social Justice on College Campuses”

Red Laquer Room (4th Floor)

9:45 a.m. 10:00 a.m.

Break

10:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

Workshop Session I

11:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Lunchnote Address: Dr. Michael Kaufman

"Working on Campus to Reach Men with a Message Against Violence"

Red Laquer Room (4th Floor)

1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Workshop Session II          

2:30 p.m. 3:00 p.m.

Break

Monroe Ballroom Foyer, 6th Floor

3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Workshop Session III         

Thursday, October 28, 2004

8:00 a.m. – 8:30 a.m.

Continental Breakfast

Red Laquer Room Foyer (4th Floor)

8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.

Workshop Session IV

10:00 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.

Break

10:15 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.

Workshop Session V

11:45 a.m. – 1:15 p.m.

Lunch (on your own)

1:15 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.

Workshop Sessions VI

2:45 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.

Break

Red Laquer Room Foyer (4th Floor)

3:00 p.m. 4:30 p.m.

Endnote Address: Olga Trujillo, ORT Solutions

“The Impact of Sexual Violence”

Red Laquer Room (4th Floor)


Keynote Speakers

 

Keynote Address:

 

Dr. Beth E. Richie

 

 

 

Beth E. Richie is a sociologist who has been an activist and an advocate in the movement to end violence against women for the past twenty years.  The emphasis of her work has been on the ways that race/ethnicity and social position affect women's experience of violence, focusing on the experiences of African American battered women and sexual assault survivors.  She has been a trainer and a technical assistant to local and national organizations, and is a frequent lecturer for grassroots, professional as well as academic organizations.  Dr. Richie, Head of the African American Studies Department,  is also on the faculty of the Departments of Criminal Justice and Women's Studies at the University of Illinois at Chicago, and the Senior Research Consultant with the Institute on Violence, Inc., which is a model program funded by the National Institute for Justice.  Dr. Richie is the author of numerous articles and books, including the book Compelled to Crime: The Gender Entrapment of Black Battered Women, which is taught in many college courses and is cited in the popular press for its original arguments concerning race, gender and crime.  Her current work is exploring the gender dimensions of youth violence, and focuses on African American women and girls who come from low income communities.  Dr. Richie is also interested in addressing the conditions of confinement in women's prisons, an issue upon which she is a frequent lecturer and invited speaker, nationally and internationally.

 

Lunchnote Address:

 

Dr. Michael Kaufman

 

Dr. Michael Kaufman is a public speaker, consultant, coach, writer, and trainer leader on gender relations for universities, governments, corporations, professional firms, trade unions, and non-governmental organizations. Over the past decade, he has worked with organizations in thirty countries, including extensively work with bodies of the United Nations, especially UNICEF. Dr. Kaufman is a founder of the White Ribbon Campaign, the largest effort in the world of men working to end violence against women. He is the author or editor of six books on gender issues, on democracy and development studies, as well as an award-winning novel, The Possibility of Dreaming on a Night Without Stars. His articles have appeared in newspapers, magazines, and journals around the world and have been translated into languages including French, Spanish, German, Portuguese, Italian, Russian, Chinese and Japanese. He is married, has two children, and lives in Toronto, Canada. www.michaelkaufman.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Endnote Address:

 

Olga Trujillo, JD

 

 

 

 

 

 

Olga R. Trujillo is a consultant and an attorney, who after nearly 13 years with the U. S. Department of Justice started her own practice to work on sexual assault, domestic violence and child abuse issues. Her clients have included a number of national, state and local non-profit organizations such as the Family Violence Prevention Fund, the National Association of Public Child Welfare Administrators, the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges, the Pennsylvania Coalition Against Rape, the Battered Women’s Justice Project, the Connecticut Sexual Assault Crisis Services and the New York State Coalition Against Sexual Assault. Ms. Trujillo is a survivor of childhood abuse and sexual assault and applies her experiences into her work today. While at the Department of Justice, she most recently was the Director of the Special Projects Division of the Office for Victims of Crime. In that position she managed an 8M dollar discretionary grant program focusing on nationwide training and technical assistance on victim issues, including sexual assault, child abuse, domestic violence, trafficking and immigrant victims. Prior to that, Ms. Trujillo was the Legal Counsel in the Office for Victims of Crime where she helped guide the Office’s many grant programs and oversaw statutory changes. Ms. Trujillo was also the General Counsel of the Office of Justice Programs. In this position, she led the agency implementation of the Omnibus Crime Control Act of 1994, including the implementation of the Violence Against Women Act and various immigration provisions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday, October 26, 2004

 

Judicial Affairs Training

Salon 10 (3rd Floor)

9:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m

Ed N. Stoner II, Attorney at Law, Reed Smith

 

Closed to registered senior campus administrators, judicial affairs officers, and members of the judicial board.

 

Topics covered include:

 

·      Handling sexual misconduct cases in the campus setting: dispelling myths (i.e. difficulties)

 

·      Legal considerations for public and private institutions

 

·      Model student conduct code (soon to be published)

 

 

 

 

Wednesday, October 27th, 2004

 

 

Keynote Address

Red Laquer Room (4th Floor)

8:45 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.

 

Anti-Violence Work as Anti-Racist Work: Working for Social Justice on College Campuses

Beth Richie, Ph.D.

Chair of the African American Studies Program

University of Illinois at Chicago

 

This presentation will raise questions about the ways that the anti-violence movement in this country has not yet fully responded to racism and other forms of structural disadvantage in our work. Strategies for re-focusing the work towards organizing for social justice will be presented. Implications for college campuses will also be addressed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Workshop Session I (10:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.)

 

Working with Deaf Survivors on Campus

Parlor A -6th Floor

Julie Rems-Smario, Deaf Hope, Inc.          

 

This workshop will include information on Deaf Culture, Identities of the Deaf Community, assisting Sexual Assault, Domestic Violence and Stalking survivors who are Deaf, and tools campus staff can utilize to increase outreach to Deaf students on campus. ASL Interpretation will be provided.

(This workshop will be repeated in Workshop Session V )

 

Community Policing

Parlor B – 6th Floor

Chief Robert Hudd, Chief of Police, University of Connecticut Police Department

Lt. Jack Mosier, Police Lieutenant, University of Connecticut Police Department

 

The University of Connecticut and the UConn police Department have proactively embraced the philosophy of community policing. The University of Connecticut is ideally suited to a community involved policing approach. The University sits in a rural-suburban setting. The University is very much a small city with a contiguous area of over 4,000 acres, 400 building and 23 miles of University roads. There are over 90 residence halls, 4 major apartment complexes and 25, 000 plus students and staff on campus with 14, 000 living on campus. The University, like most major universities, has its own stores, restaurants, banks in addition to a hotel and major sports venues. The Police Department is a State-sworn law enforcement agency that is internationally accredited (CALEA) and consists of over 780 employees which include 51 sworn police officers. Traditional style of patrol techniques and response to calls does not meet the needs of our community. In addition to actively adopting a community police philosophy department-wide this year we created 3 sub-stations on campus housed in offices in residence halls and in the new students union (which is equivalent in size to a small full-scale shopping mall). The applications to campus safety by these direct provisions of service will be discussed. In addition, general concerns of policing a major university including celebrations that becomes riots, major sporting events and crime trends on campus will be discussed.

(This workshop will be repeated in Workshop Session III )

 

Working with Rural Communities

Parlor E – 6th Floor

Dr. Susan H. Lewis, Communications Director, National Sexual Violence Resource Center

 

This workshop offers a comprehensive overview of sexual victimization in rural areas. Based upon recent work of the same name, the presentation discusses research, and interviews with rural advocates. The presentation discusses the problematic nature of learning about and reaching rural victims; it offers a discussion on why rural sexual victimization is an “unspoken crime” and how low population density translates into a lack of victim anonymity and confidentiality. The workshop offers a discussion of the prevalence of sexual assault in rural areas and suggests that although overall crime rates may often be lower in rural areas, the rate of sexual assault in rural areas may actually be as high as or higher than in urban areas. The presentation reviews particular barriers to reporting and services that victims encounter and examines how certain characteristics and cultural traits in rural areas make populations difficult to reach and serve. Finally the workshop highlights some challenges faced by services providers and offers some promising practices. The presentation underscores the importance of giving focus and attention to the crime of rural sexual victimization as a first step to increasing our understanding and skills of advocacy within rural populations and institutions.

(This workshop will be repeated in Workshop Session II)

 

Advocacy Within a Latina Context

Sponsored by National Women’s Alliance (NWA)

Parlor F – 6th Floor

Amber C. Hanson, Family Advocate, Casa de Esperanza

Patricia Larson, Family Advocate, Casa de Esperanza

 

During this workshop we will demonstrate and discuss how we at Casa de Esperanza put our philosophy--based in Latino realities--into practice when working with Latina women in the community. We will discuss some of the barriers immigrant battered Latinas face and we will highlight how our approach to advocacy differs from other mainstream approaches and how our efforts support women and promote safety, whether or not they choose to stay with their partners.

 

 

Sustaining the Movement Over Time: Institutionalizing Campus Initiatives

Parlor H – 6th Floor

LuAnn Rolley, Project Director, Campus Gender Violence Project, The University of Vermont, Women’s Center, Burlington, VT;

Jane Bost, Project Director, University of Texas-Austin, Austin, TX;

Renate Klein, Project Director, University of Maine, Orno, ME;

Pete Meagher, Project Director, Edgewood College, Madison, WI.

 

As federal funding for violence prevention programs tightens and campus administrators increasingly scrutinize dedicated resources for anti-violence work, the development of strategies for institutionalizing grant-funded activities and staff and sustaining these efforts over time becomes more imperative. This panel discussion with a group of Project Directors will address sustainability in general, and provide specific examples of how programs and staff were institutionalized at a variety of campuses. A range of campus types and sizes will be represented. Examples from different institutions will form the basis of the discussion and interaction among attendees. The goal of the discussion is for participants to learn processes that may be successful for sustaining anti-violence efforts and identify specific strategies that could be adapted to sustain programs/staff on their particular campus.

(This workshop will be repeated in Workshop Session II)

 

New and Emerging Issues in Judicial Affairs/Model Student Conduct Code

Monroe Ballroom – 6th Floor

Edward Stoner II, Attorney at Law, Reed Smith, LLP

 

This workshop will give an overview of new and emerging issues in judicial affairs in regards to handling issues of sexual assault, domestic violence and stalking. Mr. Stoner will also discuss updates on his previous publication of the Model Student Conduct Code.

 

Critical Conversations – Part II

The Symbiotic Relationship between Personal and Social Change

Parlor G – 6th Floor

Susan Mooney, Consultant, The Generalist

 

Participants in the June 2004 critical conversation- Part I will meet to reflect and plan a presentation on the content of that conversation. Participants will present a summary of the June critical conversation at the January 2005 Institute.

 

This session is open to participants of the June 2004 critical conversation only.

 

 

 

Lunchnote Address

Red Laquer Room (4th Floor)

11:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

 

"Working on Campus to Reach Men with a Message Against Violence"

Michael Kaufman, Ph.D.

www.michaelkaufman.com

 

To effectively involve men in our efforts to reduce violence against women, we need to better understand the lives of men and the roots of the violence. With that knowledge in hand, we can create positive and exciting efforts, such as the international White Ribbon Campaign. This talk draws on Dr. Kaufman's work in campuses across North America and in thirty countries to end violence against women and transform the lives of men.

 

 

Workshop Session II (1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.)

 

Exploring The Complexities of Being a Victim

Parlor A -6th Floor

Susan Iverson, Coordinator of Safe Campus Project, University of Maine

Carey Nason, Assistant Director of Offender Accountability Initiative, University of Maine

 

This workshop will challenge the participants to consider how sexual violence prevention and educational efforts may unwittingly undermine their own goals, and realize the ways in which dominant discourses of femininity have framed our response to victims, at times further marginalizing those who do not fit the norms of good and ideal womanhood. The presenters will provide examples of ways to interrupt the script of violence against women, and will facilitate a discussion of ideas and alternatives. The session will conclude with a summary of lessons learned and implications for practice.

(This workshop will be repeated in Workshop Session III )

 

Strange Bedfellows: Uniting Professors, Greeks, Athletes and Police Officers Against Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence

Parlor B – 6th Floor

Joy Aull, Captain of Special Services, Centenary College Police Department

Lisa Bradshaw, Dean of Student Life, Centenary College

Dr. Lisa Nicoletti, Assistant Professor of Art, Centenary College

 

This presentation will focus on strategies for developing relationships between diverse departments on campus and using those relationships to implement educational programs beyond typical new student orientation programming.

(This workshop will be repeated in Workshop Session V )

 

Working with Rural Communities

Parlor E – 6th Floor

Dr. Susan H. Lewis, Communications Director, National Sexual Violence Resource Center

 

This workshop offers a comprehensive overview of sexual victimization in rural areas. Based upon recent work of the same name, the presentation discusses research, and interviews with rural advocates. The presentation discusses the problematic nature of learning about and reaching rural victims; it offers a discussion on why rural sexual victimization is an “unspoken crime” and how low population density translates into a lack of victim anonymity and confidentiality. The workshop offers a discussion of the prevalence of sexual assault in rural areas and suggests that although overall crime rates may often be lower in rural areas, the rate of sexual assault in rural areas may actually be as high or higher than in urban areas. The presentation reviews particular barriers to reporting and services that victims encounter and examines how certain characteristics and cultural traits in rural areas make populations difficult to reach and serve. Finally the workshop highlights some challenges faced by services providers and offers some promising practices. The presentation underscores the importance of giving focus and attention to the crime of rural sexual victimization as a first step to increasing our understanding and skills of advocacy within rural populations and institutions.

 

Judicial Affairs 101 for Administrators

Parlor F – 6th Floor

Dr. John Wesley Lowery, Assistant Professor, Education Leadership & Policy, University of South Carolina

 

This presentation is designed to provide participants with a clear understanding of the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act: its history, general requirements for institutions of higher education, and the requirements specifically related to sexual assault and other violent crimes on campus. In addition to the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act, the presentation will also examine the requirements of other federal legislation effecting institutional responses to sexual assault and other violent crime on campus including:

 

·  The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)

·  Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972

·  Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act

 

In additional, participants will be provided with information regarding other resources to aid institutions in compliance with this complex set of legislation requirements.

 

(This workshop will be repeated in Workshop Session III )

 

Sustaining the Movement Over Time: Institutionalizing Campus Initiatives

Parlor H – 6th Floor

LuAnn Rolley, Project Director, Campus Gender Violence Project, The University of Vermont, Women’s Center, Burlington, VT;

Jane Bost, Project Director, University of Texas-Austin, Austin, TX;

Renate Klein, Project Director, University of Maine, Orno, ME;

Pete Meagher, Project Director, Edgewood College, Madison, WI.

 

As federal funding for violence prevention programs tightens and campus administrators increasingly scrutinize dedicated resources for anti-violence work, the development of strategies for institutionalizing grant-funded activities and staff and sustaining these efforts over time becomes more imperative. This panel discussion with a group of Project Directors will address sustainability in general, and provide specific examples of how programs and staff were institutionalized at a variety of campuses. A range of campus types and sizes will be represented. Examples from different institutions will form the basis of the discussion and interaction among attendees. The goal of the discussion is for participants to learn processes that may be successful for sustaining anti-violence efforts and identify specific strategies that could be adapted to sustain programs/staff on their particular campus.


 

Building an Effective Campaign to Reach Men on Your Campus about Violence Against Women

Monroe Ballroom – 6th Floor

Michael Kaufman, Consultant, Michael Kaufman Consulting

 

This interactive workshop will provide a great opportunity to examine the roadblocks to reach men on our campuses with clear and positive messages about ending violence against women. Most importantly, drawing on Dr. Kaufman's experience on dozens of campuses, it will help participants develop effective strategies and a clear roadmap to build an effective campaign.

 

Critical Conversations – Part II

The Symbiotic Relationship between Personal and Social Change

Parlor G – 6th Floor

Susan Mooney, Consultant, The Generalist

 

Participants in the June 2004 critical conversation- Part I will meet to reflect and plan a presentation on the content of that conversation. Participants will present a summary of the June critical conversation at the January 2005 Institute.

This session is open to participants of the June 2004 critical conversation only.

 

 

 

*************** BREAK (2:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.) ***************

(Snacks and Beverages provided)

Monroe Ballroom Foyer, 6th Floor

 

Workshop Session III (3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.)

 

The Power of Change Is In Our Hands

Parlor H – 6th Floor

Zaynab Nawaz, Program Associate, Women’s Human Rights Program, Amnesty International USA

 

Many people view human rights violations as happening in foreign countries and not necessarily affecting our daily lives. Human rights, however, are violated daily in the US and on college campuses – more specifically, violence against women. This workshop will discuss Amnesty International’s Stop Violence Against Women (VAW) Campaign, an introduction to human rights, why VAW is considered one of the greatest human rights scandals of our time, and how university and college students can mobilize and take local action to bring the “global” issue of human rights to their campuses in an effective way.

(This workshop will be repeated in Workshop Session IV )

 

Exploring The Complexities of Being a Victim

Parlor A -6th Floor

Susan Iverson, Coordinator of Safe Campus Project, University of Maine

Carey Nason, Assistant Director of Offender Accountability Initiative, University of Maine

 

This workshop will challenge the participants to consider how sexual violence prevention and educational efforts may unwittingly undermine their own goals, and realize the ways in which dominant discourses of femininity have framed our response to victims, at times further marginalizing those who do not fit the norms of good and ideal womanhood. The presenters will provide examples of ways to interrupt the script of violence against women, and will facilitate a discussion of ideas and alternatives. The session will conclude with a summary of lessons learned and implications for practice.

 

Community Policing

Parlor B – 6th Floor

Chief Robert Hudd, Chief of Police, University of Connecticut Police Dept

Lt. Jack Mosier, Police Lieutenant, University of Connecticut Police Department

 

The University of Connecticut and the UConn police Department have proactively embraced the philosophy of community policing. The University of Connecticut is ideally suited to a community involved policing approach. The University sits in a rural-suburban setting. The University is very much a small city with a contiguous area of over 4,000 acres, 400 building and 23 miles of University roads. There are over 90 residence halls, 4 major apartment complexes and 25, 000 plus students and staff on campus with 14, 000 living on campus. The University, like most major universities, has its own stores, restaurants, banks in addition to a hotel and major sports venues. The Police Department is a State-sworn law enforcement agency that is internationally accredited (CALEA) and consists of over 780 employees which include 51 sworn police officers. Traditional style of patrol techniques and response to calls does not meet the needs of our community. In addition to actively adopting a community police philosophy department-wide this year we created 3 sub-stations on campus housed in offices in residence halls and in the new students union (which is equivalent in size to a small full-scale shopping mall). The applications to campus safety by these direct provisions of service will be discussed. In addition, general concerns of policing a major university including celebrations that becomes riots, major sporting events and crime trends on campus will be discussed.

 

Peer Educators: Reducing Campus Violence, Creating Social Change

Parlor E – 6th Floor

Rebecca Gordon, Ed.D., Director of the Office of Women's Affairs, University of Illinois at Chicago ;

Heather Imrie, Assistant Director, Campus Advocacy Network, University of Illinois at Chicago;

Linda Deanna, Dean of Students, University of Illinois at Chicago;

Aarati Kasturirangan, Graduate Assistant, University of Illinois at Chicago

David Lee Anderson Jr, Peer Educator, Campus Advocacy Network, University of Illinois at Chicago;

Sam Hawkins, Peer Educator, Campus Advocacy Network, University of Illinois at Chicago

Alma Moore, Peer Educator, Campus Advocacy Network, University of Illinois at Chicago

Melanie Stinson, Peer Educator, Campus Advocacy Network, University of Illinois at Chicago

 

Learn the nuts and bolts of how to develop and implement a peer educator course and program.  How to obtain course credit for the program, develop the curriculum, and recruit students will be covered.  Learning objectives for the course, a sample syllabus, readings and assignments will be provided.  How to integrate an intersectional model for understanding the causes of interpersonal violence as well as involving outside community advocacy agencies will be discussed.  Current peer educators will present innovative interactive exercises that they developed as part of the course.

 

Judicial Affairs 101 for Administrators

Parlor F – 6th Floor

Dr. John Wesley Lowery, Assistant Professor, Education Leadership & Policy, University of South Carolina

 

This presentation is designed to provide participants with a clear understanding of the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act: its history, general requirements for institutions of higher education, and the requirements specifically related to sexual assault and other violent crimes on campus. In addition to the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act, the presentation will also examine the requirements of other federal legislation effecting institutional responses to sexual assault and other violent crime on campus including:

 

·  The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)

·  Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972

·  Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act

 

In additional, participants will be provided with information regarding other resources to aid institutions in compliance with this complex set of legislation requirements.

 

Working with Native Women on Campus

Monroe Ballroom – 6th Floor

Bonnie Clairmont, Victim Advocacy Specialist, Tribal Law and Policy Institute.

 

This workshop will be addressing cultural considerations when working with a Native woman who’s been victimized; importance of having resources available; a discussion of Native communities current responses to violence against women with a discussion focused on Native women attending a predominantly white college. 

 

(This workshop will be repeated in Workshop Session VI )

 

Critical Conversations – Part II

The Symbiotic Relationship between Personal and Social Change

Parlor G – 6th Floor

Susan Mooney, Consultant, The Generalist

 

Participants in the June 2004 critical conversation- Part I will meet to reflect and plan a presentation on the content of that conversation. Participants will present a summary of the June critical conversation at the January 2005 Institute.

This session is open to participants of the June 2004 critical conversation only.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Wednesday, October 27, 2004

Day-At-A-Glance

Time

Event/Topic/Speaker

Room

8:00 a.m. – 8:30 a.m.

Registration

Red Laquer Room Foyer

(4th Floor)

8:00 a.m. – 8:30 a.m.

Continental Breakfast

Red Laquer Room Foyer

(4th Floor)

8:30 a.m. – 8:45 a.m.

Welcome

Red Laquer Room

(4th Floor)

8:45 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.

Keynote Address:Anti-violence work as Anti-racist work: Working for Social Justice on College Campuses”

Dr. Beth Richie

Red Laquer Room

(4th Floor)

9:45 a.m.10:00 a.m.

Break

10:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Workshop Session I

Working with Deaf Survivors

Parlor A -6th Floor

Community Policing

Parlor B-6th Floor

Working with Rural Communities

Parlor E-6th Floor

Working with Latinas

Parlor F- 6th Floor

Sustaining the Movement Over Time: Institutionalizing Campus Initiatives

Parlor H- 6th Floor

New and Emerging Issues in Judicial Affairs/Model Student Conduct Code

Monroe Ballroom –

6th Floor

**Critical Conversations (Part II)

(**Open Only to Part I, June 2004 Participants)

Parlor G – 6th Floor

11:30 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

Lunchnote Address: "Working on Campus to Reach Men with a Message Against Violence." Dr. Michael Kaufman

Red Laquer Room

(4th Floor)

1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Workshop Session II

Exploring the Complexities of Being a Victim

Parlor A -6th Floor

Strange Bedfellows: SA & DV

Parlor B-6th Floor

Working with Rural Communities

Parlor E-6th Floor

Judicial Affairs 101 for Administrators

Parlor F- 6th Floor

Sustaining the Movement Over Time: Institutionalizing Campus Initiatives

Parlor H- 6th Floor

Building an Effective Campaign to Reach Men on Your Campus about Violence Against Women

Monroe Ballroom –

6th Floor

**Critical Conversations (Part II)

(**Open Only to Part I, June 2004 Participants)

Parlor G – 6th Floor

2:30 p.m. 3:00 p.m.

Break (snacks and beverages provided)

Monroe Ballroom Foyer

3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.

 

 

 

Workshop Session III

Exploring the Complexities of Being a Victim

Parlor A -6th Floor

Community Policing

Parlor B-6th Floor

Peer Educators: Reducing Campus Violence, Creating Social Change

Parlor E-6th Floor

Judicial Affairs 101 for Administrators

Parlor F- 6th Floor

The Power of Change Is In Our Hands

Parlor H- 6th Floor

Working with Native Women on Campus

Monroe Ballroom –

**Critical Conversations (Part II)

(**Open Only to Part I, June 2004 Participants)

Parlor G – 6th Floor

 

 

Thursday, October 28th, 2004

 

 

Workshop Session IV (8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.)

 

She Said, She Said: Approaches to Handling Same-Sex Sexual Assault & Domestic Violence in Judicial Process

Parlor A – 6th Floor

Martha Compton Pierce, Assistant Director, Office of Student Conduct North Carolina State University

Maggie Olszewska, Assistant Director, Office of Student Conflict Resolution, North Carolina State University

 

Sexual assault and domestic violence are unfortunate realities on college campuses. As institutions, we have developed many prevention programs, response protocols, and adjudication techniques to deal with these issues. But what happens when the students involved are members of the same sex? How do we adapt our approach? Should we? Join us as we discuss these questions and more.

(This workshop will be repeated in Workshop Session V )

 

Grants Management System (GMS)

Parlor B – 6th Floor

Kevin Sweeney, GMS Customer Support and Trainer, Master Key Consulting

 

Question and Answer session on GMS- The Department of Justice grants management system used by all grant funded programs to upload Semi Annual Progress Reports and generate multiple reports to congress.  Presenter will address specific information and questions on the submitting of final reports due from grantees.

 

Curriculum Infusion

Parlor E – 6th Floor

Pamela Pranke, Campus Violence Intervention Advocate, ND SANE Network Coordinator

 

One of the effective ways of reaching students on creating awareness around violence against women issues has been through curriculum infusion classes in any major. The presenter, Pamela Pranke of Jamestown College, has direct experience in creating curriculum infusion in course such as Nursing, Ancient Egyptian History, Physical Education, Elementary Education, Developmental Psychology, Education Seminars, Mental Health and Ethics. She will talk about her experience creating her latest manual, Curriculum Infusion Manual for Nursing Education, her experience on her campus, as well as how participants may begin this process on their campuses.

(This workshop will be repeated in Workshop Session VI )

 

What is it about the Walls? A Report of African American Women’s Experiences of Domestic Violence in the Lincoln, Nebraska Area

Parlor F – 6th Floor

Renita Tyrance, Co-Director of OASIS, University of Nebraska – Lincoln

 

The “Walls” of the title represent literal as well as figurative walls for the study participants. These participants believed that it was these “walls” that obstructed their access to services. The invisible walls described by the women led facilitators of the project to identify five key areas of focus for service improvement:

  1. Domestic violence service provision.
  2. Correctional facilities.
  3. Governmental agencies including: Law enforcement; educational systems; medical service systems; and legal systems.
  4. Faith-based organizations.
  5. Media.

The report offers recommendations for improved services and policy changes directed toward these institutions, as well as practical first steps toward achieving the goals of widening the knowledge of domestic violence services for women of color in their communities.

(This workshop will be repeated in Workshop Session VI )

 

The Power of Change Is In Our Hands

Parlor H – 6th Floor

Zaynab Nawaz, Program Associate, Women’s Human Rights Program, Amnesty International USA

 

Many people view human rights violations as happening in foreign countries and not necessarily affecting our daily lives. Human rights, however, are violated daily in the US and on college campuses – more specifically, violence against women. This workshop will discuss Amnesty International’s Stop Violence Against Women (VAW) Campaign, an introduction to human rights, why VAW is considered one of the greatest human rights scandals of our time, and how university and college students can mobilize and take local action to bring the “global” issue of human rights to their campuses in an effective way.

 

Clery Act

Monroe Ballroom – 6th Floor

Kim Wible, Chief of Police, Department of Public Safety, San Francisco State University

 

The workshop will explore the Clery Act in a more in depth fashion and provide a forum for discussion on the different and complex issues that campuses face.

(This workshop will be repeated in Workshop Session VI )

 

 

****************** BREAK (10:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.) ******************

 

Workshop Session V (10:15 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.)

 

Working with Deaf Survivors on Campus

Monroe Ballroom – 6th Floor

Julie Rems-Smario, Executive Director, Deaf Hope, Inc.       

 

This workshop will include information on Deaf Culture, Identities of the Deaf Community, assisting Sexual Assault, Domestic Violence and Stalking survivors who are Deaf, and tools campus staff can utilize to increase outreach to Deaf students on campus. ASL Interpretation will be provided.

 

She Said, She Said: Approaches to Handling Same-Sex Sexual Assault & Domestic Violence in Judicial Process

Parlor A – 6th Floor

Martha Compton Pierce, Assistant Director, Office of Student Conduct North Carolina State University

Maggie Olszewska, Assistant Director, Office of Student Conflict Resolution, North Carolina State University

 

Sexual assault and domestic violence are unfortunate realities on college campuses. As institutions, we have developed many prevention programs, response protocols, and adjudication techniques to deal with these issues. But what happens when the students involved are members of the same sex? How do we adapt our approach? Should we? Join us as we discuss these questions and more.

 

Office on Violence Against Women

Parlor B – 6th Floor

Myrta Charles, Program Specialist, Office on Violence Against Women (OVW), Department of Justice (DOJ)

Sandy Ortman, Director of Special Programs, California Coalition Against Sexual Assault (CALCASA)

 

Question and answer session between grantee Project Directors and Program Specialists of OVW.

 

It’s all Greek to me! Fraternities & Sororities: Friends or Foes?

Parlor E – 6th Floor

Hayden M. Greene, Advisor to Fraternities, Sororities & Social Fellowships, Montclair State University.

 

This program seeks to give the attendee a clear sense of the differences in fraternities and sororities and their true purpose on campus. It will deal the different types of Greek organizations, their different foci, their terminology and who their members are, generally.

We will deal especially with fraternities and how they can be converted from infractors to allies. The discussion should show how these organizations can be used as resources once they are re-identified with their core value systems.

 

Strange Bedfellows: Uniting Professors, Greeks, Athletes and Police Officers Against Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence

Parlor F – 6th Floor

Joy Aull, Captain of Special Services, Centenary Police Department, Centenary College

Lisa Bradshaw, Dean of Student Life, Centenary College

Dr. Lisa Nicoletti, Assistant Professor of Art, Centenary College

 

This presentation will focus on strategies for developing relationships between diverse departments on campus and using those relationships to implement educational programs beyond typical new student orientation programming.

 

Rural Campuses and Rural Students

Parlor H – 6th Floor

Renee Stromme, Campus Violence Project Director, North Dakota Council on Abused Women/ Coalition Against Sexual Assault in North Dakota

Linda Isakson, Rural Project Director, North Dakota Council on Abused Women/ Coalition Against Sexual Assault in North Dakota

 

This workshop will look at rural student issues from two perspectives: providing services on rural campuses and in rural locations; and share characteristics of rural students, both those who remain in rural areas and those who attend college in more urban settings. Providing services on rural campuses creates unique concerns. We will look at barriers for services, level of awareness and education surrounding the issues of violence against women, and the conditions surrounding domestic violence and sexual assault in rural and remote communities. Students from rural and remote areas carry with them cultural issues rarely considered in outreach work on campuses (because rural life is a culture of its own). We will spend time talking about characteristics and cultural aspects of rural life and what that means for college students from rural and remote locales.

(This workshop will be repeated in Workshop Session VI )

 

 

 

*********** LUNCH (11:45 a.m. -1:15 p.m., Own Your Own) ************

 

Workshop Session VI (1:15 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.)

 

Working with Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) Students on Campus (Advanced) – Sponsored by National Women’s Alliance (NWA)

Parlor A – 6th Floor

Kim Fountain, Education, Outreach, and Training Manager, NYC Gay and Lesbian Anti-Violence Project (AVP).

 

This workshop will address hate crimes within and against members of the lesbian, transgender and queer communities with specific attention paid to people who identify as lesbian, queer and/or transgender and people of color. Moving beyond the homophobia 101 or hate crimes 101 models, this presentation explores the difficult reality that many victims and survivors of hate crimes do not access services for a variety of reasons that include, but are not limited, to the intersections of homophobia, racism, classism, heteronormativity, and misogyny. We will also explore what factors may keep a women from: 1) identifying that the violence she experienced was motivated by bias/hate; 2) knowing what services are open to her; 3) being empowered to access the services; 4) confronting potential revictimization while accessing services; and 5)potentially, healing.

 

Working with Native Women on Campus

Parlor B – 6th Floor

Bonnie Clairmont, Victim Advocacy Specialist, Tribal Law and Policy Institute.

 

This workshop will be addressing cultural considerations when working with a Native woman who’s been victimized; importance of having resources available; a discussion of Native communities current responses to violence against women with a discussion focused on Native women attending a predominantly white college. 

 

Curriculum Infusion

Parlor E – 6th Floor

Pamela Pranke, Campus Violence Intervention Advocate, ND SANE Network Coordinator, Jamestown College

 

One of the effective ways of reaching students on creating awareness around violence against women issues has been through curriculum infusion classes in any major. The presenter, Pamela Pranke of Jamestown College, has direct experience in creating curriculum infusion in course such as Nursing, Ancient Egyptian History, Physical Education, Elementary Education, Developmental Psychology, Education Seminars, Mental Health and Ethics. She will talk about her experience creating her latest manual, Curriculum Infusion Manual for Nursing Education, her experience on her campus, as well as how participants may begin this process on their campuses.

 

What is it about the Walls? A Report of African American Women’s Experiences of Domestic Violence in the Lincoln, Nebraska Area

Parlor F – 6th Floor

Renita Tyrance, Co-Director of OASIS, University of Nebraska – Lincoln

 

The “Walls” of the title represent literal as well as figurative walls for the study participants. These participants believed that it was these “walls” that obstructed their access to services. The invisible walls described by the women led facilitators of the project to identify five key areas of focus for service improvement:

  1. Domestic violence service provision.
  2. Correctional facilities.
  3. Governmental agencies including: Law enforcement; educational systems; medical service systems; and legal systems.
  4. Faith-based organizations.
  5. Media.

The report offers recommendations for improved services and policy changes directed toward these institutions, as well as practical first steps toward achieving the goals of widening the knowledge of domestic violence services for women of color in their communities.

 

Rural Campuses and Rural Students

Parlor H – 6th Floor

Renee Stromme, Campus Violence Project Director, North Dakota Council on Abused Women/ Coalition Against Sexual Assault in North Dakota

Linda Isakson, Rural Project Director, North Dakota Council on Abused Women Coalition Against Sexual Assault in North Dakota

 

This workshop will look at rural student issues from two perspectives: providing services on rural campuses and in rural locations; and share characteristics of rural students, both those who remain in rural areas and those who attend college in more urban settings. Providing services on rural campuses creates unique concerns. We will look at barriers for services, level of awareness and education surrounding the issues of violence against women, and the conditions surrounding domestic violence and sexual assault in rural and remote communities. Students from rural and remote areas carry with them cultural issues rarely considered in outreach work on campuses (because rural life is a culture of its own). We will spend time talking about characteristics and cultural aspects of rural life and what that means for college students from rural and remote locales.

 

Clery Act

Monroe Ballroom – 6th Floor

Kim Wible, Chief of Police, Department of Public Safety, San Francisco State University

 

The workshop will explore the Clery Act in a more in depth fashion and provide a forum for discussion on the different and complex issues that campuses face.

 

 

*************** BREAK (2:45 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.) *****************

Snacks and Beverages provided)

 

Red Laquer Room Foyer, 4th Floor

Endnote Address

Red Laquer Room Foyer, (4th Floor)

3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.

 

The Impact of Sexual Violence

Olga Trujillo, O.R.T Solutions

 

The presentation will focus on the complex responses survivors have to sexual violence. It will address the issues of trauma and how it effects an individual’s reaction to a sexual attack and its aftermath. This presentation will also help campus law enforcement, student programming, judicial affairs, peer educators and campus counseling better understand why victims of sexual violence may not always behave they way they believe they should. Finally, this workshop will explore how they can enhance their response in sexual violence cases.


 

Thursday, October 28, 2004

Day-At-A-Glance

Time

Event/Topic/Speaker

Room

8:00 a.m.– 8:30 a.m.

Continental Breakfast

 

Red Laquer Room Foyer-4th Floor

8:30 a.m.–10:00 a.m.

Workshop Session IV

She Said, She Said

Parlor A -6th Floor

Grants Management System (GMS)

Parlor B – 6th Floor

Curriculum Infusion

Parlor E-6th Floor

“What is it About the Walls? “ A Report of African American Women’s Experiences of Domestic Violence in the Lincoln, Nebraska Area

Parlor F- 6th Floor

The Power of Change Is In Our Hands-Amnesty International

Parlor H- 6th Floor

Clery Act

Monroe Ballroom

6th Floor

10:00 a.m.–10:15 a.m.

Break

10:15 a.m.–11:45 a.m.

Workshop Session V

She Said, She Said

Parlor A -6th Floor

Office on Violence Against Women

Parlor B-6th Floor

It’s all Greek to Me! Fraternities & Sororities: Friends or Foes?

Parlor E-6th Floor

Strange Bedfellows: SA & DV

Parlor F- 6th Floor

Rural Campuses and Rural Students

Parlor H- 6th Floor

Working with Deaf Survivors on Campus

Monroe Ballroom

6th Floor

11:45 a.m–1:15 p.m.

Lunch (on your own)

1:15 p.m.– 2:45 p.m.

Workshop Sessions VI

Working with Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) students on Campus (Advanced)

Parlor A -6th Floor

Working with Native Women on Campus

Parlor B-6th Floor

Curriculum Infusion

Parlor E-6th Floor

“What is it About the Walls? “ A Report of African American Women’s Experiences of Domestic Violence in the Lincoln, Nebraska Area

Parlor F- 6th Floor

Rural Campuses and Rural Students

Parlor H- 6th Floor

Clery Act

Monroe Ballroom

6th Floor

2:45 p.m.– 3:00 p.m.

Break (snacks and beverages provided)

Monroe Ballroom Foyer

3:00 p.m.4:30 p.m.

Endnote Address:The Impact of Sexual Violence,”

Olga Trujillo, ORT Solutions

Red Laquer Room

(4th Floor)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


PRESENTER BIOGRAPHIES

 

 

David Lee Anderson, Jr

David Lee Anderson Jr. is pursuing a major in marketing and management major at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He was a graduate of the Top Teens of America. David has a long history of community and faith-based involvement. He has tutored as part of a literacy program as well as ministered in various Chicago land churches. David became a Peer Educator in 2004 and has provided workshops for students in the upward bound program. David is planning to develop an anti-violence program for the faith based community to increase awareness of interpersonal violence.

 

Joy Aull

Joy Aull is Captain of Special Services at the Centenary College Department of Public Safety.  She is responsible for the development and implementation of departmental policies and crime prevention programs.  She oversees all departmental technology systems including NCIC and LLETS.  Captain Aull is also the Clery Compliance Officer for the College.

Joy Aull graduated from Hardin Simmons University with a Bachelor of Behavioral Science degree in Criminal Justice in 1989.  While in school she completed an internship at a tri-county Restitution Center.  Upon graduation she went to work as a Community Service Officer in a pilot pre-parole program in Texas, which focused on the rehabilitation of criminals prior to their release. After moving to Louisiana, Mrs. Aull graduated from a regional Police Academy and was presented an award for the highest scholastic average.  She then worked as a patrol officer and later as the only female patrol supervisor in the Louisiana State University Police Department in Baton Rouge. Although she has been interested in the topic of sexual assault and domestic violence since College, her work as a patrol officer reinforced her desire to look for effective education and victim support programs.  In 1996 she was certified as a Rape Aggression Defense Instructor.  As a result of her efforts, the Centenary College Department of Public Safety became one of the sponsors of the 2002 STOP Violence Against Women Statewide conference.  Last year she was elected to serve as co-chair of the Northwest Louisiana Sexual Assault Taskforce.  In 2002 Capt. Aull wrote the College’s application for the Grants to Reduce Violent Crimes Against Women and she currently serves as the project director. 

 

Lori Bradshaw

Lori Bradshaw is the Dean of Student Life at Centenary College of Louisiana.  She oversees Career Services, Centenary Fitness Center, Counseling Services, Health Services, Residence Life and Student Involvement.  Bradshaw is also responsible for New Student Orientation and serves as the retention officer for the college. Lori Bradshaw completed her undergraduate degree at Cameron University (OK) and her graduate studies at Emporia State University (KS).  She was the Director of Student Activities at University of the Ozarks (AR) and at Cameron University before arriving at Centenary College in January 2000.

Jane Bost

Jane Bost serves as the Project Director for the University of Texas at Austin's Voices Against Violence Project, funded by a United States Department of Justice Violence Against Women on Campus grant. Jane also serves as a fulltime Associate Director of the Counseling and Mental Health Center at the University of Texas where she has worked since 1992. Prior to this position at UT, Jane was the Director of Counseling Services at Southwestern University, Georgetown, Texas from 1984-1992. She holds a Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology from Oklahoma State University and is a licensed psychologist. Jane has climbed to the top of Mt. Whitney twice and hiked to the bottom of the Grand Canyon 7 times.

 

 

Bonnie Clairmont

Bonnie Clairmont is a member of the HoChunk Nation of Wisconsin, resides in St. Paul, Minnesota where she is employed with the Tribal Law and Policy Institute (TLPI) as the Victim Advocacy Specialist. Prior to her recent employment with the TLPI, Bonnie was Outreach/Client Services Coordinator for Sexual Offense Services of Ramsey County, a rape crisis center. She has worked for the past 20+ years providing services to victims of sexual assault and domestic violence & providing multidisciplinary training/collaboration on the needs of victims of sexual assault and their concerned persons. She has dedicated much of her work to providing and improving services for victim/survivors of sexual and domestic violence and child sexual abuse, particularly those from American Indian communities. She has been a member of the Ramsey County Sexual Assault Protocol Team (a project she co-authored a grant & provided primary leadership). For 4 years she coordinated the Strengthening the Circle of Trust conference, a conference focusing on sexual assault and exploitation perpetrated by American Indian “spiritual leaders/medicine men.”

 

Linda Deanna

Linda Deanna, PhD, is the Associate Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs/ Dean of Students for the University of Illinois at Chicago. She graduated from the University of Detroit-Mercy with Bachelor of Arts degree. She received her Masters from the University of Southern California in College Student Personnel Administration and her doctorate from Loyola University. Her dissertation focused on the advocacy role of student affairs professionals in higher education. Linda has held positions in student affairs at Pepperdine, Bowling Green, University of Wisconsin Madison, and Loyola Universities. She currently serves as a member of the campus grant's advisory committee at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

 

Kim Fountain

Kim Fountain is the Education, Outreach, and Training Manager at the New York City Gay and Lesbian Anti-Violence Project. When she is not working at AVP, she is teaching at Pace University in the anthropology department. Here areas of focus are violence against and within LGTB communities, globalization, and the politics of gender.

 

Rebecca Gordon

Rebecca Gordon is the director of the Office of Women's Affairs at the University of Illinois at Chicago and is the project director of the campus grant. She received her BS (1981) in Psychology from the University of Pittsburgh. She received her MA (1985) and EdD (1990) from Northern Illinois University in Clinical Psychology and Educational Psychology & Counseling, respectively. In addition to her twenty years of clinical experience, Rebecca has developed and implemented campus-wide anti-violence educational initiatives including media campaigns, freshmen orientation and gender and women's studies class for peer educators. In her position as the grant project director, Rebecca has contributed to the development of current policies and procedures relating to issues of campus violence, overseen the development of on-line crime reporting form and data base and will be launching an on-line training program for Clery Campus Security mandated crime reporters.

 

Hayden Greene

Hayden Greene is the Advisor to Fraternities, Sororities, and Social Fellowships at Montclair State University in New Jersey. He has facilitated many workshops for the 32 organizations on campus. His experiences with the very diverse population at Montclair and at previous schools, makes him an authority of the many different types of Greek organizations and Social Fellowships. He has presented at numerous conferences on Greek Life and for his fraternity as well. He is a Life Member of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity and a former state officer. Hayden has been a member of the grant team at Montclair State University since its inception.

 

 

 

 

Amber C. Hanson

Amber C. Hanson came to Minnesota from the Dominican Republic at the age of 17. She received her Bachelor’s degree in Latin American Studies and Spanish from the University of Wisconsin Eau Claire. While pursuing her undergraduate degree, Amber was actively involved in the Black and Latino Student Association. Amber is currently working as a Family Advocate at Casa de Esperanza.Amber is also pursuing her Master’s degree at the University of Colorado at Denver. She is looking forward to graduating in May of next year with a Master’s in Public Administration with an emphasis in Domestic Violence.

 

Sam Hawkins

Sam Hawkins received his undergraduate degree in biology from UIC in 2004. During his last semester he took (GWS 294, Preventing Violence, and Creating Social Change?). He found the material presented in the class and the experience gained through the class to be crucially relevant to the future he envisioned for himself. Sam plans to go to medical school and to focus on family and community health. He currently lives in Louisville, KY.

 

Robert S. Hudd

Robert S. Hudd began his career in law enforcement immediately after graduating from college in 1979. He started with the Windham County Sheriff’s Department in Vermont where he worked initially in patrol and then as a juvenile officer for the County. He has been with the University of Connecticut Police Department since 1981. He is a graduate of the Vermont and Connecticut Police Academies, the Connecticut Police Command College, the U.S. Se3cret Service Dignitary Protection School in Washington D.C. and a graduate of the F.B.I. Law Enforcement Executive Development Seminar. At the University of Connecticut, Chief Hudd is responsible for a division of over 130 employees and units located on the main campus in Storrs and at campuses throughout Connecticut. Total sworn police officers now numbers over 75 officer and commanders. In addition, the department is proud of its international accreditation by the Commission on Law Enforcement Accreditation (CALEA). Chief Hudd serves, by appointment of the Governor, on the board of the Police Officers Standards and Training Council for the State of Connecticut (P.O.S.T.). Chief Hudd earned a Bachelor’s Degree in Sociology with Honors from Marlboro College in Vermont and a Master’s Degree in Liberal Studies from Wesleyan University.

 

Heather Imrie

Heather Imrie is the campus advocate for the UIC Campus Advocacy Network, which was one of the first university based advocacy programs. Heather has provided legal, administrative and crises advocacy for survivors of sexual assault, domestic violence and stalking for over 6 years. Over the last year she has also worked with the Institute for Public Safety Partnerships; a group that brings law enforcement and community together to provide community policing trainings. Around Chicago she volunteers her training services for programs like Rape Victim Advocates. Recently she has been asked by the School of the Art Institute of Chicago to assist them in developing a campus-wide anti-violence education program.

Linda Isaakson

Linda Isakson is currently the project coordinator for the North Dakota Council on Abused Women’s Services Rural Collaboration Project. She has been working with rural domestic violence programs and their communities since 1996. Previously she served as the child advocacy coordinator for the North Dakota Council on Abused Women’s Services and was for 10 years Director of the Mercer County Women’s Action & Resource Center. Her recent experiences include development of an economic assistance component for CAWS and domestic violence programs that work with victims of domestic violence and sexual assault on TANF and the development of criminal justice response protocols for local community response teams. Linda has been working in the domestic violence field since 1984 and brings a variety of work experiences to this presentation

 

 

Susan V. Iverson

Susan Iverson serves as Assistant Director of Offender Accountability Initiatives with the University of Maine’s Safe Campus Project. In her current position, she is primarily responsible for authoring policies and protocols addressing sexual assault, relationship abuse, and stalking. She has volunteered as a rape crisis counselor in Massachusetts, served on a board of directors for county commission against domestic violence in Virginia, and has authored institutional sexual assault policies. Iverson is a doctoral candidate in Higher Educational Leadership at the University of Maine in Orono, ME; she also holds a B.A. in English from Keene State College (NH), a M.A. in Higher Education Administration from Boston College, and a M.Ed. in Counseling from Bridgewater State College (MA).

 

Aarati Kasturirangan

Aarati Kasturirangan is currently pursuing her PhD in Community Psychology at the University of Illinois at Chicago. She has worked for 10 years in the sexual assault/domestic violence movements. Aarati is a founding member of Incite! Chicago, a group of radical women of color working to end violence in all its forms.

 

Renate Klein, Ph.D.

Renate Klein is associate professor of family studies at the University of Maine and director of the Safe Campus Project. She works with members of different communities on gender, culture, conflict, and violence prevention. Current projects include one on educational theatre in Maine, and a human rights initiative in Europe.

 

Patricia Larson

Patricia Larson has experience working with VAWA Self-Petitions and coordinating services for battered Latinas in the area of family law. She actively participated in the Immigrant and Refugee Battered Women’s Task Force for two years and is currently a Family Advocate at Casa de Esperanza.

 

Susan Lewis, Ph. D.

Susan Lewis is the Communications Director for the National Sexual Violence Resource Center (NSVRC), Susan’s responsibilities includes writing, editing, layout and design of all NSVRC publications; she researches and writes original publication, including booklets on underserved populations; With a Ph.D. in Applied History and Social Science from Carnegie-Mellon University, Susan’s training, research experiences and skills reflect a deep understanding of social history. Her work includes the highly acclaimed publications, Sexual Assault in Indian Country: Confronting Sexual Violence and Unspoken Crimes: Sexual Assault in Rural America. Susan presents workshops and trainings on sexual assault on various specific underserved populations, and especially frequently on rural sexual victimization. Additionally, her abilities include a strong sense of design and sensitivity to visual communication. Susan serves as Editor of the NSVRC newsletter, The Resource and writes frequent feature articles; she produces press releases, speeches, reports; interacts with the media, government officials and allied organizations; she oversees Public Relations and develops and coordinates nationwide Sexual Assault Awareness Month (SAAM) campaign.

 

John Wesley Lowery

Dr. John Lowery is the Assistant Professor of Higher Education and Student Affairs in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policies at the University of South Carolina. He earned his doctorate at Bowling Green State University in Higher Education Administration. Before beginning his doctoral work in 1996, he was Director of Residence Life at Adrian College in Michigan and University Judicial Administrator at Washington University in St. Louis. John has been very active in professional associations. He currently serves the Association for Student Judicial Affairs (ASJA) as CAS Director and chairs the Legislative Advisor Committee. He served as a Director-at-Large for the ASJA from 1996 until 1999. He has previously chaired the Legislative Issues and Resolutions Committees of the Association as well as co-chairing the Interassociation Task Force on the National Baseline Study on Campus Sexual Assault. John previously served as Member-at-Large on the NASPA Board, on the Core Council on Outreach and Advocacy for the American College Personnel Association (ACPA), and on the directorate body of Commission 15: Campus Judicial Affairs and Legal Issues of ACPA. John has a Masters degree in student personnel services from the University of South Carolina and his undergraduate degree in religious studies is from the University of Virginia. He is a frequent speaker and author on topics related to student affairs and higher education, particularly legislative issues and student judicial affairs. In recent years, John has presented at numerous conferences including the American College Personnel Association Convention, the Association for Student Judicial Affairs Conference, Donald D. Gehring Campus Judicial Affairs Training Institute, the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators Conference, the Southern Association for Student Judicial Affairs Conference, the Stetson University Law and Higher Education Conference, and the University of Vermont’s Legal Issues in Higher Education Conference.

 

Pete Meagher

Pete Meagher has been the Project Director of the Campus Safety Project with Edgewood College in Madison, Wisconsin since the project’s inception in 1999. Mr. Meagher comes to Edgewood with a strong background in work on issues of violence against women. He has led training sessions in colleges and other educational settings that have focused on male violence. Most recently, Pete has been involved with efforts to institutionalize grant funded initiatives, the successful operation of Edgewood’s Peer Educator Program, teaching the Male Role Class (a service based class focusing on men and violence), facilitating the formation of the Men Against Violence Program, creating Edgewood’s comprehensive Sexual Misconduct Policy, and providing training for security, resident assistants and others on campus.

 

Alma Moore

Alma Moore is currently a second year student at the University of Illinois at Chicago.  She is a recipient of the President's Award scholarship program and a member of the Honor's College.  Alma's experience volunteering as a tax preparer for the elderly has created a commitment to getting involved both on- and off-campus.  As a freshman, she registered for the first peer educator class for students interested in reducing campus violence.  Alma has been an active member of the peer educators and has presented programs for incoming students.  Alma also interned for the Chicago Project for Violence Prevention her freshmen year.  Alma is a member of the Black Student Union, Feminists United, and Rugby team at UIC.

 

John C. Moshier

Lieutenant Moshier began his career in criminal justice working part-time with Connecticut Adult Probation while in college. Upon graduation, he joined the Department of Corrections as a Treatment Officer in the mental health unit assigned to the segregation and protective custody housing areas in Connecticut’s maximum security prison. During this time he also worked as a Deputy Sheriff in Windham County. In 1984, he joined the University of Connecticut Police Department and graduated from the Connecticut Police Academy. While working with the UConn Police, he attended many training course and seminars pertaining to crime prevention and law enforcement, among them work with the California Highway Patrol, Protective Services Division. Through the years, Lt. Moshier was promoted from Patrolman to Detective to Sergeant to Master Sergeant to his current rank. He is assigned to Special Services working directly for the Police Chief. Lieutenant Moshier holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Psychology and Applied Social Relations from the Eastern Connecticut State University.

 

Carey Nason

Carey Nason is the coordinator of the Safe Campus Project at the University of Maine. One of her primary roles is providing support, information, and resources for students, faculty and staff in regard to the issues of sexual violence, abuse in relationships and stalking. She is also involved in providing training and workshops to the campus community around the areas of interpersonal violence. Her previous experience includes serving as a rape crisis advocate, working with families at risk of child abuse and neglect, and assisting adults who have developmental disabilities. Carey has a B.A. in Sociology from the University of Maine, Orono.

 

Zaynab Nawaz

Zanab Nawaz is the Program Associate with the Women’s Human Rights Program of Amnesty International USA (AIUSA) in New York. She has a B.A. in International Relations from the College of William & Mary and an M.A. in International Studies from the University of London, School of Oriental and African Studies. Her areas of study have included International Law and Anthropology of the Middle East. Zaynab has also been a Researcher with UNICEF on issues of Violence Against Women and Girls. Currently at AIUSA, Zaynab is Assistant Editor of the Women’s Rights quarterly newsletter- Interact-and manages AIUSA’s participation in the worldwide Amnesty International Stop Violence Against Women Campaign.

 

Dr. Lisa Nicoletti

Lisa Nicoletti is Assistant Professor of Art and Visual Culture and the Turner Art Gallery Director at Centenary College of Louisiana.  Her research areas include the Holocaust, representations of women, and the history of photography.  In 2003, she received a Deutscher Akademischer Austausch Dienst award to conduct research on Holocaust representations at Cornell University, and was admitted to the Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies seminar on literature and the Holocaust at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.  She has a special interest in experiential learning techniques and socially conscious art and film, and curates art exhibitions, facilitates guest speakers, and develops film series each semester to complement not only her courses but Centenary’s First Year Experience program.

 

Maggie Olszewska

Maggie Olszewska is presently serves as the Assistant Director for the Office of Student Conflict Resolution at East Carolina University in Greenville, NC. She has worked in the areas of housing, judicial affairs, mediation, community services, and commuter student programs. Olszewska received a B.S. from Drexel University, a M.Ed. from the University of Georgia, and is currently pursuing an Ed.D. from East Carolina University.

 

Martha Pierce

Martha Pierce is the Assistant Director in the Office of Student Conduct at North Carolina State University in Raleigh, NC. In addition to her work in judicial affairs, she has experience in residence life, career services, and student activities. Martha received her B.A. from Keene State College in Keene, NH and her M.A. in Student Development from Appalachian State University in Boone, NC.

 

Pamela Pranke

Pamela Pranke is an RN MSN CCDSP, graduated from the University of Wisconsin – Madison with a BSN and completed a master’s degree from Marquette University in Nursing, Adult Health/ Education. While studying at Marquette, she gained an appreciation for women’s health issues. After earning her MSN in 1988, she and her family moved to Jamestown, ND where she became faculty at Jamestown College. In Jamestown, her career as a volunteer advocate began at Safe Shelter while on campus she became a faculty advisor to Peer Educators. Pam was present when the ND consortium first discussed the availability of the Department of Justice grant to prevent and intervene with violence against women on campuses. The Jamestown College Campus Advocate position became vacant after the grant had been initiated on campus for several years. Pam gave up her Associate Professor position to take on that responsibility. In addition to working as the campus advocate, she wrote a complete curriculum infusion manual for nursing education related to violence against women. Utilizing both nursing and violence against women knowledge, Pam also works as the ND SANE Network Coordinator. In this position she guides, connects and assists those initiating and maintaining ND SANE programs and offers technical assistance to the Council of Abused Women Services/ Coalition Against Sexual Assault in ND.

 

Julie Rems-Smario

Deaf since birth, Julie Rems-Smario started her career in 1990 with Five Acres Deaf Program in Pasadena, California, working with at risk families on child abuse prevention.  She graduated from California State University, Northridge with a BA in Liberal Studies and MA in Deaf Education.  After moving to Northern California in 1993, Julie joined the Catholic Charities Hearing Impaired Program to work with at risk Deaf families on parenting skills.  She taught parenting classes for five years. Julie then worked at the California School for the Deaf in Fremont as a teacher for Deaf pre-schoolers and their families to facilitate language development and family communication.  At the same time, Julie went to San
Francisco State University and received her MS degree in Rehab Counseling for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing.  Afterwards, Julie worked as a counselor for Deaf Services at Ohlone College in Fremont.  Six years ago, Julie found her niche, passionately advocating for Deaf survivors of domestic and sexual violence.  She is the founding executive director of DeafHope, a domestic and sexual violence service center in Hayward, California.  
She resides in Castro Valley, California, with her Deaf husband and three children.

 

Melanie Stinson

Melanie Stinson is a junior at the University of Illinois at Chicago studying English writing. She has been involved with the Office of Women's Affairs and the Campus Advocacy Network as a Peer Educator for about a year now. Along with creating awareness about sexual assault and domestic violence, Melanie is also involved with About Face Youth Theatre and their student outreach program which, through acting and workshops, creates queer youth awareness. It is through such programs that Melanie may successfully identify as an activist...and much more.

 

Ed Stoner

Edward N. ("Ed") Stoner II is the head of the firm’s higher education practice group. A nationally recognized leader in higher education law, he is the immediate Past President of the National Association of College and University Attorneys ("NACUA"). Mr. Stoner is a native of Arlington, Virginia. He received his B.A. from DePauw University in Greencastle, Indiana, in 1969 and received his J.D. in 1972 from the University of Virginia, where he served as an editor of the Law Review. Since graduating from the University of Virginia, Mr. Stoner has practiced law with Reed Smith. Mr. Stoner’s practice is concentrated in higher education with an emphasis on the employment law issues upon which he focused in the early part of his practice. Mr. Stoner is a charter member of the Association for Student Judicial Affairs and has been a frequent speaker at ASJA Annual Conventions. In 1990, he published an article in the Journal of College and University Law entitled "Harnessing the Spirit of Insubordination: A Model Student Disciplinary Code." 17 J.C.U.L. 89 (1990). This Model Code has been used as a starting point for student conduct codes by colleges around the country. Mr. Stoner received the ASJA Distinguished Service Award in 1995 "in recognition of exceptional contribution in the area of judicial affairs." Mr. Stoner is admitted to practice in Pennsylvania and Florida, and is a member of the Bar of the Supreme Court of the United States.

 

Renee Stromme

Renee Stromme is the Project Director of ND WEAV and the ND Campus Violence Project. She earned her B.A. in English and Women’s Studies from Moorhead State University in 1996. After graduation, she relocated to Phoenix, AZ and served as a crisis counselor/case manager at PREHAB of Arizona’s Autumn House, a 24-hour domestic violence crisis shelter. Renee later served as the first Legal Advocate with the Domestic Violence Legal Advocacy Program. While in Arizona she helped the Arizona Coalition Against Domestic Violence initiate a court watch program. In 2000, she then returned to her home state of ND for employment with the ND Council on Abused Women’s Services to head up the ND Campus Violence Project.

 

 

 

Kevin Sweeney

For the past year, Kevin Sweeney has worked with the online Grant Management System (GMS) at the Office of Justice Programs (OJP), a component of the U.S. Department of Justice. He provides assistance to applicants for federal grants and also to OJP staff on how to use this system. Additionally, Mr. Sweeney contributes by analyzing and developing solutions for system changes and improvements and gathers requirements for new functionalities. Kevin Sweeney is experienced in numerous application and development software packages. Mr. Sweeney holds Bachelors of Arts and Science in History from The Catholic University of America.

 

Renita Tyrance

Renita Tyrance is the new co-director of OASIS, comes to this position having served the past two years as director of the Culture Center and supervisor of the Minority Assistance Program. Renita received her Bachelor of Science in Education: English and Social Studies from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Her Master of Education was completed at UNL in Curriculum and Instruction. Currently she is a PhD student in Sociology at UNL. In 2000 Renita returned to UNL (after ten years in public and private school education); she started her graduate career as a research assistant in the department of Sociology and spent her second years as a graduate teaching assistant and Program Evaluator of the Ronald E. McNair Baccalaureate Project. Her PhD research assesses the impact of children witnessing violence on their ability to thrive in the classroom and she has become increasingly concerned with post traumatic stress syndrome in women survivors of domestic violence. Renita has served since August 1999 as Women’s Ministry Coordinator for the Fellowship of Christian Athletes. She is a member of the task force on Violence Against Women on Campus at UNL. She is serving as co-chair of this year’s Martin Luther King Day. She serves on the Recruitment and Retention Committee and the Nebraska Union Executive Board as the Council of Student Affairs Directors and UNL’s Enrollment Management Committee as well as participating with numerous other committees.

She was Graduate Student-Mentor of the Year in 2001, a Teacher Incentive Award Winner of the Anti-Defamation League in Boston in 1995 and is a program graduate of the prestigious Harvard University Teachers as Scholars in 1997 and recently co-authored study “‘What Is It About The Walls?’ A Report on the Domestic Violence Services African American Women Receive in the Lincoln, Nebraska Area” commissioned by the Rape Spouse Abuse Crisis Center, Friendship Home and the Family Violence Council to assess the response of domestic violence services to battered women in the African American community and to identify ways to improve this response.

 

Chief Kimberly Wible

Kimberly Wible has been the San Francisco State University Chief of Police for  sixteen years, holds a Doctorate of Jurisprudence and a Bachelor Degree in Sociology and Social Welfare and Corrections.  Chief Wible has served in all ranks at San Francisco State University in the last twenty-four years, and recently completed a special appointment as the  California State University Police Systemwide Police Administrator, coordinating the police administrative function at the CSU Office of the Chancellor.  The San Francisco State University Police Department consists of twenty-seven sworn and fifty civilian employees.  She regularly provides training in the areas of Prevention of Violence in the Workplace, Sexual Assault Response Teams, Emergency Preparedness and is the CSU Systemwide Trainer on the implementation and compliance of the Clery Act. Chief Wible served on the 2003 California Governor's Sexual Assault Task Force which created the "Campus Blueprint to Address Sexual Assault."  Chief Wible led the Clery compliance and training efforts  for the twenty-three CSU Campuses which was a factor in the receipt of the Security, on Campus Jeanne Clery Award to the CSU in 2002.`

 

 

CALCASA Staff Biographies

Kavin Black

Training & Technical Assistance Specialist

Kavin Black began his work in the field of sexual assault prevention and intervention in 1988. He has worked six years in prevention education, four years providing victim advocacy, volunteer recruitment and training and three years as the Executive Director of Rape Counseling Service of Fresno. Kavin has over 300 hours of courtroom testimony on the trauma experienced by victims of sexual assault and victim preparation for court. He has been an instructor for California POST Secondary Academies for sex crime investigators and worked on the Sexual Assault Response Team, Juvenile Offender Taskforce and Multidisciplinary Interview Center for child victims in Fresno County. Kavin has extensive experience with grant research, writing and management. His education emphasis is in criminology with minors in ethnic studies and child development. Kavin joined the CALCASA Campus Program team in July 2002.

 

Emily C. Chen

Training & Technical Assistance Specialist

Emily has been involved in social justice/social change work through community organizing since her youth. She has worked with local and national organizations on issues including immigration, violence against women, civil rights, youth organizing, and poverty. Before joining CALCASA, she worked for the Minnesota Coalition against Sexual Assault as the Communities of Color Outreach Program Coordinator, and has experience providing technical assistance on the local and national level.

 

Emily has a BA in Political Science, with minors in Psychology and East Asian Studies. Currently she is working toward her graduate degree in Public and Nonprofit Administration. She joined CALCASA in December of 2003.

 

Dan Esparza

Training & Technical Assistance Specialist

Dan Esparza has over 6 years experience in the rape crisis field. Before joining the California Coalition Against Sexual Assault (CALCASA), first in the Rape Prevention Resource Center, and currently in the DOJ/OVW Campus Program, Dan was a rape crisis counselor, volunteer and operations coordinator, and interim Co-Director of the Rape Crisis Center at the Center for Community Solutions (CCS) in San Diego, CA. As the first male of color to work at the rape crisis center in San Diego, he has brought much attention to diversity in all aspects of his work. He has worked on several projects focusing on the needs of monolingual Spanish-speaking survivors, the Deaf Community, the LGBT Community, male survivors of sexual assault, university students, and training of law enforcement on responding to sexual assault survivors. Dan has also written CALCASA’s Information Packets entitled Focusing on Pride: Sexual Assault Prevention in the LGBT Community (Part I and II).

 

Dan has trained with the National Multicultural Institute in Washington D.C. on developing diversity training and cultural competency in the workplace, as well as the Train-the-Trainers Program on Human Rights Education through the University of Minnesota’s Human Rights Center. In addition, he also served on the Centers for Disease Control’s (CDC) satellite downlink advisory committee on reaching marginalized and underserved communities in the US.

 

Dan is currently involved with Amnesty International USA’s Women’s Human Right Program as the Western Region Representative on the National Women’s Steering Committee, and is also on the Western Region Human Right Education Advisory Committee, in planning for the 2005 Violence Against Women Institute in San Francisco. He holds a degree in Foreign Languages from the University of Texas: El Paso.

 

Sandy Ortman

Director of Special Programs

Sandy Ortman has been the Director of Special Programs for the California Coalition Against Sexual Assault (CALCASA) since October of 2003. The Special Programs component at CALCASA houses the Education and Training Grant to End Violence Against Women with Disabilities and the Training and Technical Assistance Grant to Reduce Violent Crimes Against Women on Campus, both of which are funded by the Office on Violence Against Women, U.S. Department of Justice. Under Special Programs, Ms. Ortman is also coordinating the Campus Sexual Assault Research Project for the Office of the Governor of California, concerning California's college campuses and their response to sexual assault.

 

At the beginning of her career, Ms. Ortman worked in Residence Life as a Resident Director both at Ohio University and University of California, Davis. Next, she focused on her commitment to ending violence against women as the Assistant Coordinator for the Rape Prevention Education Program (RPEP) at UC Davis, where she worked to develop an interactive role play program, provided victim advocacy, crisis counseling and peer education training. Prior to joining CALCASA in 2000, Sandy worked for the Great Rivers Girl Scout Council, in Cincinnati, Ohio, concentrating on program management and development.

 

Ms. Ortman is involved in many aspects of ending violence against women both on college campuses and in the community. She has assisted campuses with strategic planning, judicial policy and protocol review, and development of peer education programs and media relations. She most recently completed the production of the Campus Violence Prevention Resource Guides, a unique set of materials aimed at collaboration building and training of campus partners and their role in ending violence against women. Ms. Ortman has been appointed to several boards and committees such as the National Asian Women's Health Organization Working Partners Council, and the National Institute of Justice Technical Working Group on "Prevention Rape Through Bystander Education". She graduated from Ohio University with a B.A in Sociology/ Criminology and a M.Ed. in College Student Personnel Services.

 

Erin Volk

Program Specialist

Erin Volk has been recently promoted to the position of Program Specialist for the Special Programs component at California Coalition Against Sexual Assault (CALCASA). The Special Programs component at CALCASA houses the Education and Training Grant to End Violence Against Women with Disabilities and the Training and Technical Assistance Grant to Reduce Violent Crimes Against Women on Campus, both of which are funded by the Office on Violence Against Women, U.S. Department of Justice.

 

In her previous capacity of Program Associate, also under Special Programs, Erin provided high-level logistical and administrative support and coordination to both T&TA grants. Erin also provided administrative support and coordination to the recently completed Campus Sexual Assault Research Project (also housed under the Special Programs component) for the Office of the Governor of California, which generated a comprehensive report addressing the lack of uniformity in the response of California's college campuses to sexual assault.

 

While in college, completed training and became a sexual assault peer counselor and interned/volunteered at a local rape crisis center. She acted as both a crisis-line counselor and advocate for victim/survivors in a predominately college community and through this experience gained a great deal of insight and passion for the work. In conjunction to her work at the rape crisis center, Erin interned as a Paralegal at a campus-based community legal center where she provided information, referrals and assisted domestic violence and stalking victim/survivors in their pursuit of legal action, most often in the form of restraining orders. Erin holds a BA in Political Science with a minor in Women’s Studies.

 

 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

 

Thank you to the University of Illinois at Chicago volunteers for their help during the CALCASA Institute:

 

Harish Ananthapadmanabhan

Tamica Blair

Jocelyn Carr

Andie Celerio

Amber Commodore

Rose Fernandez

Sam Hawkins

Aarati Kasturirangan

Akane Kumagai

Aaron Lewin

Elizabeth Magett

Alana Stegich

Melanie Stinson

Jana Thomure

Nicole Waldron

                 

Thank you also to the ASL Interpreters:

 

Amber Hodson, Interpreter, Deaf Hope, Inc. www.deaf-hope.org

Catherine Thomas, Eaton Interpreting Services, www.eatoninterpreting.com